Chapter 1: Code of Discretion

What’s the meaning of “true love” shared between two colonized individuals?

At this point in his life, Amani aka Trillion does NOT want to find out! 

A professional revolutionary, Amani uses his alter ego Trillion to navigate the treacherous seas of dating on the “colony” though his comrade Damu tells him love is just beyond the horizon. 

Will the persistence of a past hookup be Amani’s undoing or will Trillion help Amani avoid commitment at all cost?

Either way, it goes, it’s Trillion’s Way or no way at all!

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***MATURE CONTENT, 18+*** 

Boy on boy 

character list :

         Amani, aka Trillion

Damu

Quazi        

Shamir        

Princetta

CHAPTER 1

Code of Discretion 

It’s 3 am as I climb into my Uber. I nod and briefly smile to the driver as we make eye contact through her rearview mirror. Continue reading “Chapter 1: Code of Discretion”

Decolonizing Time Itself

By: Chief Mouhamadou Diagne

As impossible as it may seem the settler has managed to colonize the abstract phenomenon that is time itself. I refer to “time” here as both a resource that is violently exploited from the working-class colonized masses and a way of measuring the passing of the present.

Human beings have always measured time by looking at nature. Whether it’s using the sun, the moon,  or the seasons we have always looked to nature to keep track of the passing of time.

The Ancient Egyptians used large obelisks to track the movement of the sun, to measure the passing of time. Other societies like the Zhou Dynasty of ancient China used the flowing of water to measure the passing of time.

The colonization of time happened in two different ways. Firstly the way in which we count and measure time has been violently forced on colonized people across the world. Secondly, the actual time colonized people have available to themselves has been colonized for capitalist exploitation.

Continue reading “Decolonizing Time Itself”

The Significance of Colonized Children’s Stories

By: Chief Nyah Akerele

How many African’s and Indigenous individuals can recall our colonial education offering a true perspective on how this country, the United States of America, was founded? How many of us can remember the books we were read as children that offered affirmations of who we were as African or Indigenous people? Who were our childhood heroes or heroines? Who did we aspire to grow up and emulate? What were the causes we adopted so early in life as “noble”, “honorable”, or “brave”? What types of behavior did we view as “criminal”? What types of stores did we find comical? To what did we cling that paralleled to our indigenous cultures? What did we see in the media and read in our children’s books that made us love being us?

Many of us that were born in the late 70s and 80s make up the millennial generation and grew up with Disney, Nickelodeon, Dr. Sues, Marvel superheroes and so forth. Very few of those characters, if any, were African or Indigenous and even if they were, the narrative was skewed to such a degree that it made the oppressor look like the hero, such as in the Disney version of Pocahontas. 

Continue reading “The Significance of Colonized Children’s Stories”

Africa For The Africans!

By Mouhamadou Diagne

I ain’t tryna get into it If you on some  “I ain’t African, I’m Afro-WTV-tf” or “I’m not African, I’m mixed” or “I’m not Black, I’m a person of color” or whatever race science nonsense the colonizer uses to divide Africans and other colonized people. Please remember capitalism and colonialism created these artificial divisions between working-class colonized people. Continue reading “Africa For The Africans!”