Decolonize Yo’ Diet: Patí Costeño

Patí Costeño Nicaragüense

 

Pati is a popular Nicaragua breakfast or snack that is often made at home if your family is from “La Costa.” I was introduced to Pati from an early age because my mother was born and raised in Bluefields. Bluefields is the capital of the South Caribbean Autonomous Region in Nicaragua.

The origins of Pati come from our Afro-Caribbean ancestors, specifically enslaved Africans from Jamaica, a country from which a large number of the ancestors of the Afro-Caribbean ethnic groups that live in the country migrated to Nicaragua.

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Who’s really REAL?!

By Diakiesse Lungisanni Chief of Political Education and Culture

Fem Queen performance has been and will ALWAYS be one of my fave’ categories when it comes to the Ballroom scene. For those of you who have been living under a rock during the era of the FX show Pose, a fem queen is basically a transgender woman who competes in the Ballroom scene. Fem Queen Performance is a category where Fem Queens compete against each other through voguing.

The sensuality, THE HAIR! Most importantly the pure, raw, uncut creativity CANNOT be matched anywhere else! 

“What in the entire f*ck?” was my reaction when I was watching some recent clips of the Fem Queen Performance category at The Last Time to Shine Ball, Old School Edition, via Youtube, where this Icon, a supposed leader within the Ballroom scene, criticized and CHOPPED a young transgender woman because she was wearing padding. This clip alone has started a conversation, not only within the Ballroom scene but in the GSNA/Black Queer sector of our nation as a whole. What became overwhelmingly clear was the divide between GSNA men and African transgender women, and the disgusting, vile ideals of gender “normality” forced upon us by wyt power!

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Thanksgiving and the African Revolutionary

By: Chief Gazi Kodzo

Well, it’s that time of the year, comrades when we are gravitated by guilt back towards our family for the Colonizer’s Holiday Season. The first Holiday is Thanksgiving, where the resources of the working class are pocketed by farmers and airlines.

Thanksgiving has a special place in the hearts of Colonized Revolutionaries. It either speaks to a time where you witnessed a family member exposing the colonial holiday for its brutal genocidal nature or you were that family member that did the exposing. I remember I learned about the natives being the first people of this land in first grade. No matter how nice my teacher tried to make the story about them three ships sound, I was very clear on who the bad guys and good guys were. I made an announcement on that Thanksgiving how disgusted I was by this story.

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